Champlain Exploring the Canadian Wilderness

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-USZ62-3019 Annotation: This print shows Samuel de Champlain and two companions looking at a river as Indians carry the canoes to the shore. Born in the small Atlantic port of Brouage around 1580 to a Protestant family (although he became a Catholic), Samuel de Champlain fought in Henri IV’s army…

Exercises of the Youths

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-USZ62-37992 Annotation: This engraving shows native youths shooting arrows, throwing balls at target placed atop tall pole, and running races. Year: 1591

The Dances at their Great Feasts

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-USZ62-37992 Annotation: This engraving shows native youths shooting arrows, throwing balls at target placed atop tall pole, and running races. Year: 1591

A Noblewoman of Pomeiock

Credit: Library of Congress Rare Book and Special Collections Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA Media type: engraving Description: English: Native woman of Pomeiock carrying a clay vessel, and her daughter holding a doll and a rattle. Museum Number: LC-USZ62-76084 Year: 1590

The First Americans

Landing of Columbus

Credit: Architect of the Capitol Media type: painting Museum Number: Annotation: Vanderlyn, Landing of Columbus Year: 1847

The Burning of Master John Rogers (From the Third Volume of the Ecclesiastical History Containing the Acts and Monuments of Martyrs, By John Fox)

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: Annotation: John Rogers (1500-1555)was a Catholic priest who converted to Protestantism in the 1530s under the influence of William Tyndale and assisted in the publication of Tyndale’s English translations of the Bible. John was burned alive at Smithfield on February 4, 1555, and he became the “first Protestant martyr”…

The Columbus Doors

Credit: Architect of the Capitol Media type: doors Museum Number: Annotation: The Columbus Doors that stand at the east entrance of the U.S. Capitol Rotunda are an imposing sight. They stand nearly 17 feet tall and weigh 20,000 pounds. The artist was Randolph Roger, and his alto-relief bronze doors make a powerful statement about not only their subject,…

Colonial Era

The Old Plantation

Credit: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum Media type: painting Museum Number: Year: 1790

Woman Mourning By Tomb

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: painting Museum Number: LC-USZC4-1840 Year: 1842

The Eliakim Hayden Stone

Credit: Wesleyan University Press Media type: gravestone Museum Number: Annotation: Eliakam Hayden grave in Essex, CT, 1797 Year: 1797

Early National Period

Illustration from Godey’s Lady’s Book Captioned ‘Alas, They Had Been Friends in Youth, But Whispering Tongues Will Poison the Truth’

Credit: The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, The University of Virginia Library Media type: engraving Museum Number: Annotation: Godey’s Lady’s Book was a monthly periodical particularly popular amongst women in the 19th century. Initially published by Philadelphia’s Louis Godey, the magazine offered original artwork and arcticles by American contributors, many of whom were women. Godey’s Lady’s…

John Brown Lithograph

Credit: US National Park Service Media type: lithograph Museum Number: Annotation: John Brown Year: 1867

Peaceable Kingdom

Credit: National Gallery of Art Media type: painting Museum Number: Year: 1834

Outrage

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: broadside Museum Number: Annotation: This handbill urging opponents of abolitionists to obstruct an anti-slavery meeting demonstrates the depth of pro-slavery feeling. Although the handbill advocates peaceful means, violence sometimes erupted between the two factions. An emotion-laden handbill was a factor in the well-known Boston riot of October 21, 1835. In that incident,…

John Brown

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: photograph Museum Number: LC-USZ62-2472 Year: 1859

Carter’s Little Liver Pills

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: advertisement Museum Number: LC-USZ62-75898 Annotation: Trade card advertisement for Carter’s Little Liver Pills showing man dressing and woman with headache. Though available as a patent medicine into the mid 20th century, no evidence was ever brought forward to substantiate the claims that Carter’s Little Liver Pills had any effect for better or worse…

Pre-Civil War

Declaration of the Anti-Slavery Convention

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: broadside Museum Number: Portfolio 153, Folder 26 Annotation: Sixty abolitionist leaders from ten states met in Philadelphia in 1833 to create a national organization to bring about the immediate emancipation of all slaves. This organization was named the American Anti-slavery Society, and the participants elected officers and adopted a constitution and declaration. ,…

The Africans of the Slave Bark

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-USZ62-41678 Annotation: African slaves on the deck of the slave ship Wildfire Year: 1860

(Untitled)

Credit: The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles Media type: photograph Museum Number: Year: 1862

$150 Reward For Runaway

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: advertisement Museum Number: Portfolio 22, Folder 12b Annotation: Advertisement run in Kentucky newspaper ofering up to a $150 reward for the return of a runaway slave named Henry May. Even with the passage of fugitive slave legislature in the mid 19th century and the persistant use of “slave catchers”, advertisements offering rewards for…

The Slave Sale

Credit: Cosmopolitan Magazine [number 38, December 1904] Media type: engraving Museum Number: Annotation: Though the Atlantic slave trade ceased legally importing slaves on 1 January 1808, the earliest date allowed by the US Constitution, the practice of slavery and the sale of slaves in the United States continued until President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on the first…

Slavery in America

Untitled

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: photograph Museum Number: LC-B8171-7861 Year: 1865

War

Credit: Architect of the Capitol Media type: fresco Museum Number: Annotation: Capitol fresco Year: 1865

We Will Prove Ourselves To Be Men- – 127th Regiment US Colored Troops

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: decorative arts Museum Number: LC-USZ62-23097 Annotation: This is a regimental flag depicting an African American soldier standing next to Columbia holding a flag. Painted flags were an important form of popular art in the 19th century, and were used both for ceremonial and decorative purposes. David Bustill Bowser (1820-1900), a poor African-American from…