George Washington Reports on the Status of the War to Congress

George Washington Reports on the Status of the War to Congress

ByJustin McKinneyAugust 28, 2020

Author:   George Washington Date:1777 Annotation: At first glance, George Washington (1732-1799) might seem to be an unlikely choice to lead the Continental Army. His only previous military experience, during the Seven Years’ War, had not been particularly successful. He and his men had been ambushed at Pennsylvania and then been forced to surrender Fort Necessity. During the Revolution, however,…

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Generals, Federalists, Presidents,
and Major Personalities

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